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Antiracist Resources: Home

Antiracist Resources

undefinedThis resource guide is meant to help our community of teachers, students, and parents deepen their antiracist work. Given current events (June, 2020), this list focuses on African American and Black experience, and the work that White people can do to address racism. This is by no means a finite list, but a living, dynamic resource that will continue to grow with time. We welcome further suggestions and will expand to include other groups in time. 

If you decide to purchase books, please consider purchasing from Frugal Bookstore, the only Black-owned, independent bookstore in Boston, or another Black-owned bookstore. 

Additional Lists:

Race Matters Faculty Group Recommended Reads: includes works by and about other races and ethnicities.

Reading for Equity, from the WPS Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. 

Young Ethnic Scholars: Protests Dos and Don'ts: includes suggestions for reading and viewing.

Racial Violence Syllabus: Historical context syllabus from Monmouth University

 

Read: Antiracist Nonfiction

Books: Modern  

How to Be an Antiracist, Ibram X. Kendi 

So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism, Robin DiAngelo

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools, Monique W. Morris

The Fire Next Time, James Baldwin

The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks About Race, Jesmyn Ward

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, Patrisse Khan-Cullors and asha bandele

Me and White Supremacy, Layla F. Saad

I'm Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness, Austin Channing Brown

Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower, Brittney C. Cooper

Citizen: An American Lyric, Claudia Rankine

Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates

Autobiography of Malcolm X, Malcolm X (as told to Alex Haley)

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race, Beverly Daniel Tatum 

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, Bryan Stevenson

Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America, Michael Eric Dyson

They Can't Kill Us AllFergusonBaltimore, and A New Era in America's Racial Justice Movement, Wesley Lowery

White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, Carol Anderson

Books: Historical Context  undefined

Stamped! Racism, Antiracism, and You, Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi. (Young Adult version of Stamped From the Beginning) Stamped Educator Guide

Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America, Ibram X. Kendi

Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Women, Race, & Class, Angela Y. Davis

March, John Lewis

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, Richard Rothstein

Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. 

Ain't I a Woman, bell hooks

The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistence and the Origins of the United States of America, Gerald Horne

Slavery By Another Name: The Re-enslavement of of Black Americans From the Civil War to World War II, Douglas A. Blackmon

The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Khalil Gibran Muhammad

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration, Isabel Wilkerson

Read: Fiction

Americanah, Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie   

Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston

The Hate U Give, Angie Thomas

American Street, Ibi Zoboi

The Water Dancer, Ta-Nehisi Coates

The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison

An American Marriage, Tayari Jones

Red at the Bone, Jacqueline Woodson

Kindred, Octavia E. Butler

Go Tell It On the Mountain, James Baldwin

Monday's Not Coming, Tiffany D. Jackson

Here are some Black YA authors you should check out:

  • Tiffany M. Jewell
  • Bethany C. Morrow
  • Kekla Magoon
  • Mahogany Brown
  • Renee Watson
  • Dhonielle Clayton
  • Lamar Giles
  • Alicia Willams
  • Tochi Onyebuchi
  • Brandy Colbert
  • Ben Philippe
  • Tomi Adeyemi
  • Liara Tamani
  • Nicola Yoon
  • Sharon Flake
  • Justin A. Reynolds
  • Justina Ireland...there are so many more. 
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