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Copyright and Fair Use: Best Practices for Educators

Best Practices for Educators

Best Practices for Educators

What are some ways teachers can share information with their students, without violating copyright?

Ways to Share Print Sources With Your Student

Ways to Share Print Sources with Your Students:

  • Does it fall under fair use? It is spontaneous and brief? If not...
    • ​Provide students with the citation information of a book, and instruct them to find the title in the library. You can work with the librarian to purchase and place books on reserve.
    • Students are also allowed to photocopy! In a situation where one teacher may not be allowed to make multiple copies, if each student makes their own copy it may fall under Fair Use. This would be a good opportunity to teach your students about copyright.
    • Request permission from the publisher.
    • Is it available online? Instead of photocopying, provide a link with citation information (send the link in an email or show on your class website). Similarly, you can create online 'reading packets' by providing students with a list of links (and citation information).

Additional Sources

Find more information on Copyright & Fair Use in the following sources:

Print

Butler, Rebecca. Copyright for Teachers & Librarians in the 21st Century. New York: Neal-Schuman, 2011.  

Simpson, Carol. Copyright Catechism II: Practical Answers to Everyday School Dilemmas. Denver, Colorado: Linworth, 2011.

Online

"Circular 21: Reproduction of Copyrighted Works by Teachers and Librarians." United States Copyright Office: A Department of the Library of Congress. August 24, 2014. Accessed May 6, 2015. www.copyright.gov/circs/circ21.pdf.

"Know Your Copyrights: What You CAN do." Association of Research Libraries. 2007. Accessed May 6, 2015. http://www.knowyourcopyrights.org/bm~doc/kycrbrochurebw.pdf

Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library, University of Montana. "Public Domain and Creative Commons: A Guide to Works You Can Use Freely". http://libguides.lib.umt.edu/PublicDomainCC. 

What You CAN Do (ARL)

Below is a table of what you can and cannot do when using or reproducing someone else's work.

Source: "Know Your Copyrights: What You CAN do." Association of Research Libraries. 2007. Accessed May 6, 2015. http://www.knowyourcopyrights.org/bm~doc/kycrbrochurebw.pdf